News

Associate Professor Ruth Bielfeldt wins Roslyn Abramson Award

May 14, 2015

Ruth Bielfeldt, Harris K. Weston Associate Professor of the Humanities, and Sarah Richardson, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, are this year’s winners of the Roslyn Abramson Award, given annually to assistant or associate professors for excellence in undergraduate teaching.

The $10,000 award, established with a gift from Edward Abramson ’57 in honor of his mother, goes to members of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) “in recognition of his or her excellence and sensitivity in teaching undergraduates.” Recipients are chosen on the basis of their accessibility, dedication to teaching, and ability to communicate with and inspire undergraduates.

“This year’s winners of the Roslyn Abramson Award have a deep commitment to undergraduate teaching and have created unique and challenging opportunities for active learning,” said Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith. “On behalf of the College and the entire FAS, I offer them my thanks and congratulations.”

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See also: Faculty News

Timothy M. Rohan The Architecture of Paul Rudolph, Yale University Press (2014)

April 24, 2015

Based upon Rohan's dissertation supervised by Neil Levine, it is the first monograph about one of the most important architects of the postwar era.
Friday, April 24, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Codman Estate, 34 Codman Road, Lincoln, Mass.

Once acclaimed and then reviled, American architect Paul Rudolph (1918-97) had one of the most extraordinary careers in postwar Modern architecture. A student of Walter Gropius at Harvard, Rudolph was famous internationally in the 1950s and '60s for his innovative Florida beach houses, sensitive contextual buildings like the Jewett Art Center at Wellesley College, and large-scale, concrete buildings, such as his Government Service Center in downtown Boston. Author of the first monograph about Rudolph, Timothy M. Rohan of UMass Amherst explains the ideas that informed Rudolph's architecture by looking at his key works in light of the concerns of the postwar era and today. An optional tour of the nearby Gropius House follows the lecture.

See also: Alumni News

Professor Maria Gough named a Guggenheim Fellow

April 10, 2015

For immediate release April 8, 2015 2015 Fellows—United States and Canada In its ninety-first competition for the United States and Canada, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has awarded 173 Fellowships (including two joint Fellowships) to a diverse group of 175 scholars, artists, and scientists. Appointed on the basis of prior achievement and exceptional promise, the successful candidates were chosen from a group of over 3,100 applicants. The great variety of backgrounds, fields of study, and accomplishments of Guggenheim Fellows is one of the most unique characteristics of the Fellowship program. In all, fifty-one disciplines, sixty-three different academic institutions, twenty-three states and the District of Columbia, and two Canadian provinces are represented by this year’s Fellows, who range in age from twentynine to eighty-three. Sixty-nine Fellows have no academic affiliation or hold adjunct or parttime positions at universities. As in past years, the Leon Levy Foundation is providing supplemental support for Fellows with no formal academic affiliation. In addition, the Dorothy Tapper Goldman Foundation is underwriting the Fellowship in Constitutional Studies. Edward Hirsch, president of the Foundation, is enthusiastic about the Fellows in the class of 2015: “It’s exciting to name 175 new Guggenheim Fellows. These artists and writers, scholars and scientists, represent the best of the best. Since 1925, the Guggenheim Foundation has always bet everything on the individual, and we’re thrilled to continue the tradition with this wonderfully talented and diverse group. It’s an honor to be able to support these individuals to do the work they were meant to do.” Since its establishment in 1925, the Foundation has granted over $325 million in Fellowships to almost 18,000 individuals, among whom are scores of Nobel laureates and poets laureate, as well as winners of the Pulitzer Prize, Fields Medal, and other important, internationally recognized honors. During this time of decreased funding for individuals in the arts, humanities, and sciences, the opportunities created by the Guggenheim Fellowship program are increasingly important. New and continuing donations from friends, Trustees, former Fellows, and other foundations have ensured that the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation will be able to continue the mission Senator and Mrs. Simon Guggenheim set for it: to “promote the advancement and diffusion of knowledge and understanding and the appreciation of beauty, by aiding without distinction on account of race, color or creed, scholars, scientists and artists of either sex in the prosecution of their labors.” For more information on the Fellows and their projects, please visit the Foundation’s website at http://www.gf.org.

Professor Suzanne Preston Blier: Art and Risk in Ancient Yoruba: Ife History, Power, and Identity, c.1300

April 1, 2015

In this book, Suzanne Preston Blier examines the intersection of art, risk, and creativity in early African arts from the Yoruba center of Ife and the striking ways that ancient Ife artworks inform society, politics, history, and religion. Yoruba art offers a unique lens into one of Africa's most important and least understood early civilizations, one whose historic arts have long been of interest to local residents and Westerners alike because of their tour-de-force visual power and technical complexity. Among the complementary subjects explored are questions of art making, art viewing, and aesthetics in the famed ancient Nigerian city-state, as well as the attendant risks and danger assumed by artists, patrons, and viewers alike in certain forms of subject matter and modes of portrayal, including unique genres of body marking, portraiture, animal symbolism, and regalia. This volume celebrates art, history, and the shared passion and skill with which the remarkable artists of early Ife sought to define their past for generations of viewers.

The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture announces 2015-16 Postdoctoral Associateship Program

February 12, 2015

 THE AGA KHAN PROGRAM FOR ISLAMIC ARCHITECTURE (AKPIA) AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY  

IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE ITS POSTDOCTORAL ASSOCIATESHIP PROGRAM  

FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016.

The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture is pleased to invite applications for self-supported Associateships to conduct advanced historical research in Islamic art, architecture, and archaeology at Harvard University. AKPIA Associateships are intended principally for overseas scholars--preferably, but not exclusively, from Muslim countries--to support research in art and architectural history and archaeology. Our program is not intended to sponsor professional design, conservation or urban development projects, nor are they intended to support research travel. The recipient is expected to be in residence, except for one or two short research-related trips. 

We welcome applications both from senior scholars and from recent graduates. Research projects should preferably be publishable in the annual publication of the Aga Khan Program, Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World. Potentially publishable, original projects will be given preference. 

AKPIA Associates have an affiliation with Harvard University's Department of History of Art and Architecture (HAA). They are free to pursue their own research without any obligations other than presenting a public lecture on their research project--as part of the AKPIA lecture series, A Forum for Islamic Art and Architecture--and submitting an article based on the research at Harvard for consideration by the editor for publication in Muqarnas. AKPIA Associates have access to all Harvard University librariesmuseums, and facilities; they are also welcome to audit Harvard seminars, if they so choose.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS 
Applicants must have a doctoral degree (PhD, DPhil, or equivalent). 

A solid command of written and spoken English is required (the AKPIA lecture will be delivered in English).


REQUIRED MATERIALS
 
Application materials must be submitted in hard copy only; the Committee will not review application materials sent by email, nor will the Committee consider incomplete applications or applications submitted after the deadline.

The following materials are required of applicants:

    • completed, signed application coversheet (2 copies)
    • curriculum vitae (2 copies)
    • research proposal  (2 copies)
    • two different writing samples of previous research publications (2 copies each)
    • letters of recommendation* from two professors or professionals who are familiar with the applicant's research (1 copy each)
    • original transcript* from each institution where graduate work was conducted (1 per institution); photocopies will not be accepted, and transcripts must be in their original, sealed envelopes. 

*These materials may either be mailed directly to the Program from the institutions or recommenders (preferred), may be sent by a professional dossier and credentials service (such as Interfolio), or may be included with the other application materials in their original, sealed envelopes. All other materials should be submitted together in a single envelope or package.

Materials should be mailed to:

Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture
Harvard University
Attn: AKPIA Associateship Program
485 Broadway, Sackler 412
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

DEADLINE
All application materials must be received by March 10, 2015. Results will be announced mid-May.  

CONTACT INFORMATION
Please direct any inquires about the AKPIA Associateships at Harvard University to agakhan@fas.harvard.edu or 617-495-2355.

For more information, visit the website

See also: General News