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Associate Professor Ruth Bielfeldt wins Roslyn Abramson Award

May 14, 2015

Ruth Bielfeldt, Harris K. Weston Associate Professor of the Humanities, and Sarah Richardson, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, are this year’s winners of the Roslyn Abramson Award, given annually to assistant or associate professors for excellence in undergraduate teaching.

The $10,000 award, established with a gift from Edward Abramson ’57 in honor of his mother, goes to members of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) “in recognition of his or her excellence and sensitivity in teaching undergraduates.” Recipients are chosen on the basis of their accessibility, dedication to teaching, and ability to communicate with and inspire undergraduates.

“This year’s winners of the Roslyn Abramson Award have a deep commitment to undergraduate teaching and have created unique and challenging opportunities for active learning,” said Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith. “On behalf of the College and the entire FAS, I offer them my thanks and congratulations.”

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See also: Faculty News

Timothy M. Rohan The Architecture of Paul Rudolph, Yale University Press (2014)

April 24, 2015

Based upon Rohan's dissertation supervised by Neil Levine, it is the first monograph about one of the most important architects of the postwar era.
Friday, April 24, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Codman Estate, 34 Codman Road, Lincoln, Mass.

Once acclaimed and then reviled, American architect Paul Rudolph (1918-97) had one of the most extraordinary careers in postwar Modern architecture. A student of Walter Gropius at Harvard, Rudolph was famous internationally in the 1950s and '60s for his innovative Florida beach houses, sensitive contextual buildings like the Jewett Art Center at Wellesley College, and large-scale, concrete buildings, such as his Government Service Center in downtown Boston. Author of the first monograph about Rudolph, Timothy M. Rohan of UMass Amherst explains the ideas that informed Rudolph's architecture by looking at his key works in light of the concerns of the postwar era and today. An optional tour of the nearby Gropius House follows the lecture.

See also: Alumni News
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